Agriculture

Agriculture

Feeding the World

Do you love nature? Are you interested in science and feeding the world? This program is all about connecting with our resources and using the combined understandings of biology and chemistry to make the world better with crops and animals. From soil composition to livestock management, you can discover what you’re most passionate about and pursue a career in agriculture that will affect our communities and the world at large. Classes are a combination of lecture/discussion periods, lab exercises, and field trips.

Career options & salary range

Veterinarian, teacher, floral design, landscaper, drone technician, agricultural marketing, scientist or researcher, geneticist, animal trainer, feedlot manager, greenhouse production or management, farmer, company CEO, equipment technician or inspector, equipment mechanic, equipment sales, plus many more!

Skills learned

  • Build a foundation of knowledge in animal science from animal behavior to genetics and health and learn how this knowledge applies to today’s livestock industries
  • Build a foundation of knowledge in plant and crop science from the basics of plant growth to the complexities of soil and horticulture
  • Understand current issues and regulatory hurdles related to these fields and discover career pathways into agricultural fields that interest you
Grade
10

You can begin this program in 10th or 11th grade with the options to start with Animal Biology 201 or Horticulture 101. See your counselor for details.

Your Contact

Program of Study Lead

Kaitlyn Smith

Agriculture Instructor

(509) 972-5900

smithkaitlyn@WVSD208.ORG

  • Pathways

  • After graduation

    Vet assistant, lab assistant, nursery or greenhouse worker

  • 2-year options

    Veterinary technician, floral design, landscaping

  • 4-year options

    Agricultural teacher, animal producer, business owner

  • 6-year options (Master)

    Animal nutritional consultant

  • 8-year options (Doctorate)

    Veterinarian, plant or animal geneticist

  • 10-12 year options (Specialization)

    Animal anesthesiologist or animal dentist

Program requirements
AFNR 101 & AFNR 102 1.0
Horticulture Science 101 0.5 Satisfies: Lab Science
Horticulture Science 202 0.5
Animal Biology 201 0.5 Satisfies: Lab Science
Animal Biology 202 0.5
3.0 credits credit(s)

College credit earned

  • YVC AG 101, Intro to Ag
  • YVC AGSCI 101, Intro to Plant Science

Certifications & training

  • CASE Certification Animals Food & Natural Resources
  • CASE Certification Horticulture
  • CASE Certification Animal Biology

Courses

AFNR 101 & 102 ‐ 1 Credit(s)

Duration ‐ Each course is one semester earning .5 credits each

Prerequisite ‐ None, but students should have a basic understanding of physical and cell science before taking this course

Fees and Costs ‐ None

Course Overview

Welcome to AFNR – Animals, Food, and Natural Resources. This is an intro level course for students to get a broad perspective of agriculture before taking Animal Biology and/or Horticulture. There will be 2 semesters: AFNR 101 and AFNR 102. Students should have a basic understanding of physical and cell science before taking this course.

In AFNR 101, students will gain a broad understanding of both plant and animal science and also practice communication skills needed to run a successful business. Introduction to Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources (AFNR) introduces students to agricultural opportunities and the pathways of study in agriculture. Science, mathematics, reading, and writing components are woven in the context of agriculture and students will use the introductory skills and knowledge developed in this course throughout the CASE curriculum, and students can earn CASE certification

Students participating in the Introduction to Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources course experience hands-on activities, projects, and problems. Student experiences involve the study of communication, the science of agriculture, plants, animals, natural resources, and agricultural mechanics. While surveying the opportunities available in agriculture and natural resources, students learn to solve problems, conduct research, analyze data, work in teams, and take responsibility for their work, actions, and learning.

Topics include:

  • Agricultural Education – Agriculture, FFA, and SAE
  • Communication Methods
  • Science Processes
  • Natural Resources
  • Plants and Animals
  • Agricultural Power and Technology

AFNR 102 is the second semester and is a student-directed course, offering a deeper dive into the learning with even more hands-on experiences with plants, animals, natural resources, and agricultural tools. Burrow down in a soil pit to discover what is beneath your feet. Investigate the mystery of plant deaths in a greenhouse. Research the quality of water in your community and school. Determine how food should be safely stored and preserved to keep you healthy. Plan, design, and construct a habitat for local wildlife. These are just a few of many activities you will complete in Intro to AFNR.

Your days in the classroom will involve communication with peers while exploring real world issues in agriculture. You will personalize your learning by exploring careers you find interesting. Throughout the course, you'll plan experiences outside of school, identify potential awards, and seek out post-secondary schools and scholarships that meet your future career goals.

You'll have the chance to experience all fields of agricultural science and natural resources. Upon completion of the course, you will be prepared to pursue a specific agricultural career pathway using a sequence of courses of your choosing. Whether you are interested in science, communications, business, engineering, or mechanics, there is an agricultural pathway awaiting your future.

Student Learning Objectives

  • Learn how agriculture, food, and natural resources systems produce the food, fiber, and fuel that are essential to daily life as well as contribute to the nation’s economic wealth.
  • Understand how agriculture is a science that contributes to the development, improvement, and sustainability of living things.
  • Apply mathematical practices and principles.
  • Learn and follow safety standards while practicing personal responsibility in the agricultural classroom, laboratory, shop, greenhouse, and facilities.
  • Explore and practice inquiry activities to practice scientific processes and research.
  • Understand and employ technology and computer applications critical to modern agricultural practices.
  • Consider the ethical, environmental, social, and economic impacts of agricultural practices and understand these considerations are essential to being a responsible, involved citizen.
  • Perform and understand specific technical skills proficiently in the processes of agricultural production.
  • Practice reading and writing interpretation skills necessary for educational and professional development.
  • Develop effective interpersonal communication skills to facilitate group processes and aid in solving complex problems and the achievement of common goals in real-life contexts.
  • Benefit from leadership development, personal growth, and career exploration.

Animal Biology 201 ‐ 0.5 Credit(s)

Duration ‐ One semester

Prerequisite ‐ None

Fees and Costs ‐ None

Course Overview

In Animal Biology you’ll learn about genetics, reproductive physiology, growth and development, nutrition and digestive physiology, anatomy, meat science, and animal classification. Get up-to-date on issues of the dairy, poultry, equine, beef, sheep, swine, and aquaculture industries. This class offers leadership training through the Future Farmers of America (FFA).

Student Learning Objectives

  • Understand basic livestock physiology, the application of this physiology, and the industries surrounding each species as well as the evaluation of live animals
  • Understand basic cell structure and the various systems within an animal’s body
  • Explain basic concepts of animal behavior, welfare, and the skills necessary for anyone working with animals
  • Examine and identify each species of livestock from breeds, feeding programs, and housing to common health concerns
  • Discuss each species’ industry and how they deal with the ever-changing biological, economic, and regulatory hurdles
  • Recognize differences between individual animals, carcasses, and cuts of meat

Animal Biology 202 ‐ 0.5 Credit(s)

Duration ‐ One semester

Prerequisite ‐ Animal Biology 101

Fees and Costs ‐ None

Course Overview

This course is a continuation of Animal Biology 201—as a student enrolled in Animal Biology 201, you will automatically be enrolled in 202. Deepen your knowledge in this yearlong program learning about animal biology and how it relates to industries today.

Student Learning Objectives

  • Understand basic livestock physiology, the application of this physiology, and the industries surrounding each species as well as the evaluation of live animals
  • Understand basic cell structure and the various systems within an animal’s body
  • Explain basic concepts of animal behavior, welfare, and the skills necessary for anyone working with animals
  • Examine and identify each species of livestock from breeds, feeding programs, and housing to common health concerns
  • Discuss each species’ industry and how they deal with the ever-changing biological, economic, and regulatory hurdles
  • Recognize differences between individual animals, carcasses, and cuts of meat

Horticultural Science 101 ‐ 0.5 Credit(s)

Duration ‐ One semester

Prerequisite ‐ None

Fees and Costs ‐ None

Course Overview

In this introductory course you will learn the basics of horticulture and apply scientific principles and concepts through experiments. Strengthen your knowledge of science and get a better understanding of the environment, plant growth, plant classification and identification, and the importance of soil. Discover careers and opportunities available in the field of horticulture.

You’ll have the opportunity to earn 5 credits of tech-prep through Yakima Valley College for Introduction to Plant Science. This class offers leadership training through the Future Farmers of America (FFA).

Student Learning Objectives

  • Analyze the historical development of horticulture
  • Identify horticultural plants
  • Learn plant parts and their functions
  • Analyze the benefits of plants
  • Understand general plant anatomy
  • Utilize various skills in plant propagation
  • Analyze plant growth requirements
  • Apply horticultural practices
  • Understand how to grow and market a horticultural crop
  • Identify plant pest and apply pesticides
  • Learn principles of floral design and management

Horticultural Science 102 ‐ 0.5 Credit(s)

Duration ‐ One semester

Prerequisite ‐ Horticulture 101

Fees and Costs ‐ None

Course Overview

A continuation of Horticulture 101, you’ll go more in-depth into areas and concepts involved in Horticulture Science. You’ll learn to apply scientific principles and concepts through classroom and hands-on experiments and learn more about careers and opportunities available in the field of Horticulture.

You’ll have the opportunity to earn 1 credit of tech-prep through Yakima Valley College for Introduction to Agriculture. Leadership development will be provided through FFA.

Student Learning Objectives

  • Utilize skills in greenhouse management
  • Apply gardening techniques
  • Select and care for house plants and flowers
  • Demonstrate skills in basic floral design
  • Learn how to manage a nursery
  • Demonstrate proper tool and power safety
  • Utilize skills in plastic and metal pipe plumbing
  • Plan a horticultural construction project
  • Demonstrate leadership skills
  • Learn how to grow and market a horticultural crop