U.S. Army Junior ROTC

U.S. Army Junior ROTC

Citizens of Tomorrow

Are you inspired by our armed forces? Do you love teamwork? U.S. Army Junior Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (JROTC) is a program that’s about more than just service, it’s also about becoming the kind of person you want to be: strong, capable, and a leader.

You’ll learn about everything from leadership and global awareness to health and wellness and U.S. history. Whether or not you’re headed for service in the military, gain the life skills you need for success. U.S. Army JROTC is a congressionally-mandated program with the mission “Motivating Young People to be Better Citizens.” You’ll learn the importance of lifelong learning, communication, accountability, good citizenship, respectful treatment of others, and critical thinking techniques. There is no military obligation after the Army JROTC program. Let’s do this!

Career options & salary range

Whether you join the military after high school or go another route, the skills you’ll learn will empower you to be a team player, a leader, and an asset to your future employer. If you join the military you’ll have opportunities to go into many different fields. Learn more from your counselor.

Everyone on active duty receives base pay. The amount depends on your rank and how many years you've been in the military. First-year recruits earn around $19,000 a year. The higher your rank and the longer your service, the higher your pay. A senior officer with 6 or more years of experience can earn $74,000 a year or more.

Salaries also include living and clothing stipends and housing allowances, which can include up to $20-25K each year in non-taxable income.

Skills learned

  • Understand workings of the U.S. government both in history and the present day
  • Develop good citizenship, leadership, and life skills to prepare you for life after graduation
  • Learn about first aid, health & wellness, and emergency management and preparedness
  • Options to gain skills related to marksmanship and gain a deeper knowledge of the U.S. military
Grade
9

As a U.S. Army JROTC student, you'll have many different opportunities. You might get training through the Yakima Training Center, enlist, join ROTC in college, or even receive a special congressional appointment to a military academy!

Your Contact

Program of Study Lead

COL (Ret) Brian James

Senior Army Instructor

(509) 972-5990

jamesb@wvsd208.org

1SG (Ret) Jeff Parks

Army JROTC Instructor

(509) 972-5994

parksj@wvsd208.org

  • Pathways

  • Local full-time and part-time career options through the Yakima Training Center:

    MATES (Maneuver Area Training Equipment Site) receives, stores, secures, issues, maintains, and reports equipment readiness
    Join the WA Army National Guard

    To become a Federal Technician, you'll need prior Service (Active Duty) Enlistment or National Guard Enlistment. You can apply for Army dual-status federal technician vacancy (USA Jobs). There is a Military Occupational Specialty (MOS) compatibility requirement. Opportunities include Wheeled Vehicle Mechanic, Production Controller, Fire Control Repairer, Small Arms Repairer, Material Storage & Handling Specialist, and other training opportunities. If you pursue a career as a civilian Federal Technician, this is a dual-status career, which means you’d be a Federal civilian employee who must maintain military status. You’ll receive competitive pay, excellent benefits, retirement, and have options towards career progression.

  • Enlist in the Armed Forces: Army, Air Force, Navy, Marines, and Coast Guard.

    If you choose a military career, you’ll earn training, have a stable job, and receive competitive pay, education benefits, and retirement.

  • Attend college and enroll in a ROTC program.

    Afterwards, enter the workforce with business or political leadership.

  • Receive a congressional appointment to a Military Academy.

Program requirements
You must earn 3 years of credits in the program choosing from the courses below
3 years of credit(s)

College credit earned

  • CHS MSL 314 - Military History of the United States (Earn 5 college credits from CWU)

Certifications & training

  • Hunter Safety

Courses

Military PNW History ‐ 0.5 Credit(s)

Duration ‐ One semester (Satisfies History)

Prerequisite ‐ Military PNW History and Military Health are taken within the same year

Fees and Costs ‐ None

Course Overview

Taken in the same year as the Military Health course, Pacific Northwest History is a course designed to give you an overview of the region through the study of five main components of the social studies: Geography, History, Government, Economics, and Culture. The Pacific Northwest History curriculum is divided into five units according to those components. You will also complete a Washington State Classroom Based Assessment (CBA).

Student Learning Objectives

  • Demonstrate the ability to arrange events chronologically
  • Demonstrate the ability to draw inferences from ideas by explaining conditions and events
  • Distinguish between economic, political, social, and geographic pressures and ideas and their effects
  • Develop a proficiency in the vocabulary of the social studies discipline
  • Gain an appreciation for the contributions of the Pacific Northwest historical cultures to Western and particularly American civilization

Military Health ‐ 0.5 Credit(s)

Duration ‐ One semester (Satisfies Health and Occupational Ed)

Prerequisite ‐ Military Health and PNW History are taken within the same year.

Fees and Costs ‐ None

Course Overview

Time to get fit! This class is designed to give each participant a complete, total body workout. You will experience many different types of cardiovascular fitness exercises, improve flexibility, and challenge your muscles, building endurance and strength. You will also gain knowledge about health-related topics such as eating disorders, diseases, drugs, alcohol, human sexuality, STD’s, etc. This class is 60% health information and 40% fitness information. After taking this class, you will walk away with the ability to keep your body healthy and fit for the rest of your life.

Student Learning Objectives

  • Gain an appreciation of the importance of physical fitness in maintaining good health
  • Learn the effects and dangers of drug abuse, ways to resist negative peer pressure, and how to support others in drug use avoidance
  • Develop mental and physical endurance and management abilities

Military Crisis Response ‐ 1 Credit(s)

Duration ‐ Two semesters (Satisfies Health and Occupational Ed)

Prerequisite ‐ None

Fees and Costs ‐ None

Course Overview

This is a yearlong course that teaches basic emergency management and preparedness. You will learn basic use of GPS, map reading, and land navigation skills for light search and rescue operations. You will learn disaster medical operations, casualty care, and first aid techniques in the event of any natural disaster. You will also learn leadership theory and application to enhance your new skills. With this training you will get certified in CPR, AED, and Teen CERT (Community Emergency Response Team) from FEMA. High school students will be prepared to assist their communities in the midst of a crisis and assist the professional responders.

Certification: CPR, AED, Teen CERT

Student Learning Objectives

  • Explain the significance of the Good Samaritan Law
  • Identify the steps for evaluating a victim
  • Identify the seven life-saving steps of first aid
  • Identify the information needed when calling an emergency number such as 911
  • Describe the purpose of the Universal Precautions
  • Describe how to perform rescue breathing
  • Identify the steps for performing CPR
  • Explain how CPR can keep a victim’s heart and brain alive
  • Describe the steps for performing abdominal thrusts
  • Identify the three types of bleeding
  • Identify the best way to control most cases of bleeding
  • Distinguish among direct pressure, pressure points, and a tourniquet to control bleeding
  • Describe how to treat bleeding on the head or torso
  • Explain the importance of following Universal Precautions when dealing with blood and other body fluids
  • Explain how to identify and treat shock
  • Distinguish between closed and open fractures
  • Identify procedures for treating fractures
  • Distinguish between dislocations, strains, and sprains
  • Identify procedures for treating dislocations, strains, and sprains
  • Characterize degrees of burns
  • Describe how to treat first-, second-, and third-degree heat burns
  • Describe how to treat electrical burns
  • Describe how to treat chemical burns to the eyes and skin
  • Identify eight things that should not be done in treating burns
  • Identify the causes and symptoms of poisoning
  • Describe how to treat a poison victim
  • Distinguish among the four types of open wounds
  • Describe how to treat wounds and bruises
  • Explain the cause of heat injuries
  • Describe the symptoms of the three types of heat injuries
  • Explain how to treat heat cramps, heat exhaustion, and heat stroke
  • Describe how to prevent heat injuries
  • Explain the causes and symptoms of cold weather injuries
  • Explain how to treat frostbite, immersion foot/trench foot, hypothermia, and snow blindness
  • Describe how to prevent cold weather injuries
  • Identify four types of poisonous snakes
  • Describe symptoms of and treatment for snake bites
  • Describe symptoms of and treatment for human and animal bites
  • Describe symptoms of and treatment for insect bites and stings
  • Describe symptoms of and treatment for poisonous plant exposure
  • Identify ways to prevent bites, stings, and poisonous plant exposure
  • Identify the seven continents and four oceans on a globe
  • Distinguish between the two poles on a globe
  • Distinguish between the longitude and latitude lines on a globe
  • Differentiate between the equator and the prime meridian
  • Identify symbols, colors, and features on standard road maps
  • Identify locations on a city and state map
  • Communicate directions to specified sites using a city and state map
  • Differentiate between a topographic map and a standard road map
  • Identify the symbols, colors, and features of a topographic map
  • Locate grid zones and grid segments using the Military Grid Reference System
  • Determine the six-digit coordinates of given locations on a map
  • Use six-digit coordinates to locate a point on a map
  • Differentiate between elevation and relief
  • Recognize the three types of contour lines on a map
  • Calculate the elevation of points on a map
  • Recognize the ten terrain features
  • Demonstrate how to measure straight-line and curved-line distance on a topographic map using the scales on that map and procedures for calculating distances that exceed those scales
  • Identify the factors that may affect one’s pace
  • Describe how to determine distance on the ground using estimation and the factors that can cause underestimation or overestimation
  • Define the three base directions
  • Identify the symbols that represent direction on a topographic map
  • Demonstrate how to determine and measure a magnetic azimuth
  • Demonstrate how to determine, measure, and plot a grid azimuth
  • Demonstrate how to determine a back azimuth
  • Use the declination diagram to convert grid azimuths to magnetic azimuths
  • Use the declination diagram to convert magnetic azimuths to grid azimuths
  • Convert a magnetic azimuth when the Grid-Magnetic Angle is greater
  • Determine how to locate and read an eight-digit coordinate on a grid map
  • Describe the procedure for locating an unknown point on a topographic map by intersection
  • Describe the procedure for locating an unknown position on a topographic map by resection
  • Identify procedures for locating or plotting an unknown point on a topographic map using polar coordinates
  • Identify procedures for determining direction using field-expedient methods
  • Differentiate between six types of orienteering courses
  • Explain the five-step process to determine direction of travel
  • Demonstrate five movement techniques used in orienteering
  • Identify the control areas and safety aspects used in orienteering
  • Compare common units of measure for distance in air and road travel
  • Contrast aeronautical charts and topographic maps
  • Compare aeronautical symbols with topographical map symbols
  • Identify types of aeronautical charts, scales, and characteristics
  • Distinguish among the time zones
  • Identify appropriate charts for planning a flight route

Military American Government ‐ 1 Credit(s)

Duration ‐ Two semesters (Satisfies History)

Prerequisite ‐ None, however, must take both semesters in order to get full credit

Fees and Costs ‐ None

Course Overview

Build basic skills and interest in how to participate in civic and political life. Learn about the importance of the United States Constitution and the Bill of Rights, the responsibilities of U.S. citizens, basic national values, the U.S. Federal Justice System, and service to the community. The We the People curriculum explores the origins, structure, rights, and responsibilities of the American constitutional government. Learn to apply problem-solving strategies to current political and social issues. This course meets physical education/health graduation requirements or occupational education requirements as well as Senior Government 101 requirements.

Student Learning Objectives

  • Examine key ideals of United States democracy including the origins and continuing influence of key democratic ideals of the U.S. Government
  • Analyze why democratic ideals demand that people work together to reduce the disparity between those ideals and realities
  • Examine representative government and citizen participation and evaluate how citizens use and influence governmental institutions and processes to solve problems
  • Understand and explain the organization of federal, state, and local government including the executive, legislative, and judicial branches at and among the three levels of government and explain the constitutional principles that establish and limit government
  • Analyze problems and solutions related to the distribution of power between the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of government

Rifle Marksmanship – Basic (Optional Course) ‐ 0.5 Credit(s)

Duration ‐ One semester (Satisfies P.E.)

Prerequisite ‐ None

Fees and Costs ‐ None

Course Overview

The basic course is an introduction to firearms safety and rifle marksmanship. Instruction is performed with the use of air rifles and includes the opportunity to participate as a member of the Competition Rifle Team.

Certification: Washington State Hunter Safety

Student Learning Objectives

  • Identify different human marksmanship skills and recognize their historic applications
  • Discover how human marksmanship endeavors have evolved from martial/survival skills to sports skills
  • Report on important sports competitions that involve rifle shooting
  • Describe the basic rules of target shooting as a sport
  • Identify the main parts of a firearm that concern safety (muzzle, action, and trigger)
  • Develop rules for safe firearm handling
  • Understand rules and procedures for safe range operation
  • Recognize the basic equipment needed for target shooting
  • Describe how air rifles function
  • Recognize the first steps of cocking and firing an air rifle, including a correct trigger release
  • Recognize how to load and fire air rifles
  • Assume the standing position used for target shooting
  • Practice sight alignment on a blank target
  • Dry fire by performing correct trigger release
  • Aim at a target from the standing position
  • Learn how correct breathing enhances control and relaxation
  • Shoot in the standing position while performing the basic techniques for firing a shot
  • Practice shooting in the standing position while applying good shot technique
  • Adjust sights so that shot groups are centered on the target
  • Score targets correctly
  • Demonstrate how to properly use a sling in a target shooting position
  • Assume the prone position used for target shooting
  • Shoot in the prone position while performing correct shot technique
  • Describe how positions used in modern target shooting evolved from positions and skills used by soldiers in combat
  • Assume the kneeling position used for target shooting
  • Shoot in the kneeling position while performing the correct shot technique. Use a Shooter’s Diary to record critical lessons learned in marksmanship practice
  • Develop and practice a shot plan
  • Attain improved shot technique by learning to check balance and relaxation before each shot
  • Learn about sports competition opportunities available to JROTC and school rifle team members
  • Complete a regulation course of fire (3x10 shots) on the official air rifle target
  • Complete a “final” using the Olympic final round format

Rifle Marksmanship – Advanced (Optional Course) ‐ 0.5 Credit(s)

Duration ‐ One semester (Satisfies P.E.)

Prerequisite ‐ Requires instruction permission

Fees and Costs ‐ None

Course Overview

This course offers the theory and practice of Three Position air rifle shooting. Curriculum includes sports physiology, and the technical aspects of Olympic caliber competition rifles and equipment. You will also learn many components of leadership theory and application and aspects of peer coaching using the Army JROTC model. This course is offered to advanced competitive rifle shooters and requires instructor permission.

Student Learning Objectives

  • Identify different human marksmanship skills and recognize their historic applications
  • Discover how human marksmanship endeavors have evolved from martial/survival skills to sports skills
  • Report on important sports competitions that involve rifle shooting
  • Describe the basic rules of target shooting as a sport
  • Identify the main parts of a firearm that concern safety (muzzle, action, and trigger)
  • Develop rules for safe firearm handling
  • Understand rules and procedures for safe range operation
  • Recognize the basic equipment needed for target shooting
  • Describe how air rifles function
  • Recognize the first steps of cocking and firing an air rifle, including a correct trigger release
  • Recognize how to load and fire air rifles
  • Assume the standing position used for target shooting
  • Practice sight alignment on a blank target
  • Dry fire by performing correct trigger release
  • Aim at a target from the standing position
  • Learn how correct breathing enhances control and relaxation
  • Shoot in the standing position while performing the basic techniques for firing a shot
  • Practice shooting in the standing position while applying good shot technique
  • Adjust sights so that shot groups are centered on the target
  • Score targets correctly
  • Demonstrate how to properly use a sling in a target shooting position
  • Assume the prone position used for target shooting
  • Shoot in the prone position while performing correct shot technique
  • Describe how positions used in modern target shooting evolved from positions and skills used by soldiers in combat
  • Assume the kneeling position used for target shooting
  • Shoot in the kneeling position while performing the correct shot technique. Use a Shooter’s Diary to record critical lessons learned in marksmanship practice
  • Develop and practice a shot plan
  • Attain improved shot technique by learning to check balance and relaxation before each shot
  • Learn about sports competition opportunities available to JROTC and school rifle team members
  • Complete a regulation course of fire (3x10 shots) on the official air rifle target
  • Complete a “final” using the Olympic final round format

Military Drill - Basic (Optional Course) ‐ 0.5 Credit(s)

Duration ‐ One semester (Satisfies Art and Occupational Ed)

Prerequisite ‐ Must be enrolled in Competition Armed or Unarmed Drill Team

Fees and Costs ‐ None

Course Overview

This course teaches methods of instructing drill, teaching techniques, individual and unit drill, manual of arms, and various other aspects of basic and advance drill instruction.

You'll receive in-depth instruction in Army JROTC drill and ceremonies, to include honing a cadet’s ability to perform the AJROTC In-Ranks, Color Guard and Drill Card 30-step drill sequence at the appropriate level commensurate with their enrollment experience for the JPA (JROTC Program of Accreditation). This course concentrates on the elements of military drill and describes individual and group precision movements, procedures for saluting, drill, ceremonies, pass in review parades, and development of the command voice. Cadets are provided detailed instruction on ceremonial performance and protocol for civilian and military events and have the opportunity to personally learn Army drill concepts and procedures. Most of this course is hands-on learning and cadets will develop teamwork, self-discipline, pride, and esprit-de-corps.

You can continue a second semester to Advanced Military Drill.

The performance standards in this course are based on the performance standards identified in the curriculum for the US Army JROTC. Successful completion of at least three units of credit in the Army JROTC program will qualify the student for advanced placement in a college ROTC program or accelerated promotion in the military service. Cadets must wear the uniform once weekly for a grade.

Student Learning Objectives

  • Demonstrate how to think logically and communicate effectively as a cadet leader and to effectively present periods of instruction and receive/give feedback
  • Demonstrate the ability to stand at the position of attention, parade rest, and rest
  • Demonstrate the ability to march at a 30-inch step, and right/left 15-inch step
  • Perform marching movements to include rear march, double rear march, marching in place, and facing movements in marching
  • Perform basic squad drills to include forming a squad, changing interval while in line, aligning the squad, and moving the squad from point to point
  • Perform basic platoon drills to include forming a platoon, changing interval while in line, aligning the platoon and moving the platoon from point to point
  • Execute In-Ranks-inspection as a member of a squad, squad leader, and platoon leader
  • Sequence the procedure a drill leader takes to teach a drill
  • Identify characteristics of a capable drill leader

Military Drill - Advanced (Optional Course) ‐ 0.5 Credit(s)

Duration ‐ One semester (Satisfies Art and Occupational Ed)

Prerequisite ‐ Must be enrolled in Competition Armed or Unarmed Drill Team and have completed Basic Drill

Fees and Costs ‐ None

Course Overview

This course teaches advanced methods of instructing drill, teaching techniques, individual and unit drill, manual of arms, and various other aspects of basic and advance drill instruction.

You'll receive in-depth instruction in Army JROTC drill inspection, regulation, exhibition, and ceremonies. This includes honing a cadet’s ability to perform the AJROTC In-Ranks, Color Guard, and Drill Card 30-step drill sequence at the appropriate level commensurate with their enrollment experience for the JPA (JROTC Program of Accreditation). This course concentrates on the elements of military drill and describes individual and group precision movements, procedures for saluting, drill, ceremonies, pass in review parades, and development of the command voice. Cadets are provided detailed instruction on ceremonial performance and protocol for civilian and military events and have the opportunity to personally learn Army drill concepts and procedures. Most of this course is hands-on learning and cadets will develop teamwork, self-discipline, pride, and esprit-de-corps.

The performance standards in this course are based on the performance standards identified in the curriculum for the US Army JROTC. Successful completion of at least three units of credit in the Army JROTC program will qualify the student for advanced placement in a college ROTC program or accelerated promotion in the military service. Cadets must wear the uniform once weekly for a grade.

Student Learning Objectives

  • Demonstrate how to think logically and communicate effectively as a cadet leader and to effectively present periods of instruction and receive/give feedback.
  • Demonstrate the ability to stand at the position of attention, parade rest, and rest.
  • Demonstrate the ability to march at a 30-inch step, and right/left 15-inch step.
  • Perform marching movements to include rear march, double rear march, marching in place, and facing movements in marching.
  • Perform basic squad drills to include forming a squad, changing interval while in line, aligning the squad, and moving the squad from point to point.
  • Perform basic platoon drills to include forming a platoon, changing interval while in line, aligning the platoon and moving the platoon from point to point.
  • Execute In-Ranks-inspection as a member of a squad, squad leader, and platoon leader.
  • Sequence the procedure a drill leader takes to teach a drill.
  • Identify characteristics of a capable drill leader.

CHS MSL 314 - Military History of the United States (Earn 5 college credits from CWU) ‐ 1 Credit(s)

Duration ‐ Two semesters

Prerequisite ‐ Junior or senior status (can be used as U.S. History requirement)

Fees and Costs ‐ None

Course Overview

Learn about the American military’s history, spanning the colonial period to present day. The course includes an introduction to the development of the western warfare from pre-Hellenistic conflict through the Middle Ages in Europe. It includes an examination of technological innovation, evolution of the levels of warfare, and the relationship between military development, national policy, and societal expectations. This course meets a History credit OR an elective credit for graduation requirements. You will also complete a Washington State Classroom Based Assessment (CBA).

Student Learning Objectives

  • Employ American military history as a tool for studying military professionalism and for applying critical thinking skills and decision-making skills to military problems.
  • Develop an analytical framework for applying critical thinking skills to the study of historical military operations.
  • Analyze Anglo-American warfare from 1607-1763 as the emergence of the people in arms.
  • Analyze American military policy from 1783-1860 as the beginnings of professionalism.
  • Analyze the Civil War from 1861-1862.
  • Analyze the Civil War in 1863 as moving democracies toward total war. Analyze the Civil War from 1864-1865 as a total war.
  • Analyze Germany's triumph early in World War II as constituting the restoration of mobility to war.
  • Analyze victory in Europe as constituting the application of brute force in the air and on the ground.
  • Analyze victory in the Pacific as constituting the application of naval, amphibious, and air war on the operational level.
  • Analyze the Cold War and the nuclear era as a process of adjusting to weapons of mass destruction.
  • Analyze the process of limiting the Korean War.
  • Analyze the Vietnam War from 1961-1975 as constituting revolutionary and conventional warfare in an era of limited war.
  • Analyze the age of interventions as constituting projecting military power while maintaining peace.

Senior Cadet Leadership ‐ 0.5 Credit(s)

Duration ‐ One semester

Prerequisite ‐ Senior status in JROTC and instructor approval required

Fees and Costs ‐ None

Course Overview

As a fourth-year cadet, you are responsible for the daily cadet administration and perform as commanders and staff officers. This Leadership Education and Training (LET) course is the capstone course of JROTC. In this course cadets are placed in command and staff positions within the Cadet Battalion organizational structure and are responsible for planning, coordinating, and executing all Battalion events. These cadets act as assistant instructors in some subject areas for other JROTC classes. You'll continue to develop leadership skills and have the opportunity to plan special unit events such as the military ball and the annual awards banquet, as well as several Leadership Drill Meets and Spring Camp (JCLC-JROTC Cadet Leadership Challenge). Curriculum is divided into units according to those components being taught.

The performance standards in this course are based on the performance standards identified in the curriculum for the US Army JROTC. Successful completion of at least three units of credit in the Army JROTC program will qualify the student for advanced placement in a college ROTC program or accelerated promotion in the military service. Cadets must wear the uniform once weekly for a grade.

Student Learning Objectives

  • Focus is on creating positive leadership situations, decision-making, problem solving, planning, team development, project management, and mentoring
  • Gain leadership opportunities expanding on the skills taught in LET 1 – 3 type courses
  • Learn basics in etiquette, daily planning, financial planning, and careers
  • Physical fitness is emphasized through healthy individual and group competition
  • Wear the uniform once weekly for a grade